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Collective Bargaining

Company or organisational level bargaining is the most important level of bargaining in Latvia, with relatively few industry-level agreements. Despite this, collective bargaining coverage, according to the official figures, is relatively high, at 34% of all employees, although the union estimate is much lower, at 16%. There are no negotiations for large parts of the private sector.

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Financial Participation

Employee financial participation in Estonia is present mainly in the form of employee ownership and the activities of cooperatives. The importance of employee ownership has been in decline since the beginning of the 1990s, when for a short time employee ownership played an important role in the privatization process. Profit-sharing schemes are now relatively widespread (above the European average).

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European-level Representation

Estonian members of European bodies linked with European Works Councils and the European Company are normally elected by the general meeting of employees. The arrangements are slightly different when there are several Estonian companies involved.

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Board-level Representation

There is no legislation on employee representation at board level in Latvia.

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Key Facts

Population64,716,000
Collective Bargaining Coverage 98%
Proportion of Employees in Unions 8%
Principal Level of Collective Bargaining

industry and company

Workplace Representation

union and works council/employee delegates – but union normally dominates if present

Board-level Representation

yes: state-owned and private companies

Company Board Structure

monistic or dualistic (choice)

Sources: see individual country sections; where a range of figures has been quoted, the lower number has been taken

 Czech Republic

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Collective Bargaining

Collective bargaining is still primarily conducted at industry level between individual trade unions and employers' organisations. However, the system is under pressure as employers leave or never join employers' organisations, and the agreements themselves provide for greater flexibility at company level.

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